There is a myth these days that Cider Vinegar is the only healthy vinegar, and that is simply not the case. All vinegar, in particular a quality, natural, minimally processed, unpasteurized vinegar is good for you and has the same health benefits as the touted Cider Vinegar.
Me, a Mother + Isaac

Me, a Mother + Isaac

A list of the Reserve from end of season mass production.  I stored these smaller batches away to start testing their bottle aging abilities.

A list of the Reserve from end of season mass production.  I stored these smaller batches away to start testing their bottle aging abilities.

A groovy picture displaying all the different Mothers post straining

A groovy picture displaying all the different Mothers post straining

Collection of Mothers

Collection of Mothers

Examples of bottles for sale

Examples of bottles for sale

Example of bottle for sale

Example of bottle for sale

Back in 2006 I started experimenting with making vinegar from my kitchen in my NYC apartment.  I wasn't sure what I was doing, but I knew it was a process I needed to master.  It was at the beginning of the kombucha craze and I wanted to make vinegars that were lower in acid than the common options found on store shelves and smooth enough to drink for the ultimate gut balance that would fight yeast build up in the gut as opposed to kombucha that with extended consumption creates and feeds yeast build up.  I also wanted to bring awareness of healthy vinegars that aren't solely cider vinegar.  Cider vinegar isn't the only healthy vinegar and it commonly has a higher acidity than my wine based vinegars, which can make it harsh for direct consumption without dilution or sugars added.  After many experiments, I finally had a method that I was pleased with: raw fruit/veg scraps + "spent" wine + time.

When my husband and I opened our restaurant Fish & Game in Hudson, NY, I applied my self taught knowledge to making vinegar and I started a larger production of vinegar processing with waste from fruits, vegetables, herbs, pits, cores, seeds, stems, peels, anything that normally goes in to the trash or compost from prep in most commercial kitchens, along with any unusable ("spent") wine from our cellars.  After our first year of being open, I had made enough vinegar with our scraps from menu prep and production to supply the entire restaurant and it is solely used to balance acidity in the dishes at Fish & game. 

All my vinegars are made through a native fermentation process.  what does this mean?  It means that I place open vats of the fresh fruit/veg +/or herb scraps from prep with the spent wine out in the open country air and allow wild, native yeast that exists naturally in the air around us to inoculate the batches to start the fermentation process.  Each batch tastes different from the next due to this process because the wild yeasts in the air are constantly changing, as are the natural sugars in the fruits and/or vegetables. 

My collection is constantly changing.  Please check HERE to be directed to my PRODUCTS page for current availability.

 

HEALTHY VINEGAR, KNOW THE TRUTH!

 

TIPS!!

I could go on and on and on, but these are my top favorite uses for my vinegar's. They are used to nurture and heal our house in many ways all year round.

1.)  Make a “shrub” which is a colonial method of blending a sweetener (sugar, maple, honey, sorghum, what have you) with fruit juices or vinegar and basically making a syrup and diluting it with water.  It’s like a natural soda.  These should be consumed in moderation though as the sugars added to sweeten the "soda" build up candida (yeast) growth.

2.)  I make a 2:1 vinegar to water solution and rinse my hair after shampooing to remove any build up and it’s a natural conditioner.  I also apply it to a cotton swab and use on cuts or breakouts and it is a great skin toner.

3.)  Culinarily great for dressings and for balancing acidity in dishes. 

4.)  It naturally softens cotton, so I add about 1/8 C to my washing machine “softener” section when running a cycle of clothes, or I add it to the wash basin when hand washing.

5.)  It’s a wonderful natural feminine treatment and cleanser.  Adding about 3 Tablespoons to a reusable feminine douche bag and some warm water is a great cleanser post-menstrual cycle and is also a great remedy for use with yeast infections.  This same solution can be added to a squeeze bottle and used for the ears of dogs that get ear infections (most commonly yeast growth in their ears).

6.)  Adding 2 Tablespoons of vinegar to 8 ounces of warm water and sipping it when the stomach is distressed, acid reflux or heartburn are at its height will dissipate the symptoms pretty much immediately.

7.)  Soaking a small cloth in equal parts hot water and vinegar then wrung out and placed across the bridge of the nose when battling sinus congestion will assist in opening the sinuses and helps restore the skin around the sinuses.

8.)  Adding 2 Tablespoon to dog food helps with digestion and healthy gut balance like it does for humans.  

9.)  I add my vinegar to Green Clay to make a face-mask.  Deep cleans, softens and balances PH.

 

*Any information regarding the health benefits to any items I make and sell have not been evaluated by the FDA and is not intended to treat, cure, diagnose, or prevent any disease.